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  • Cushing's disease is a condition caused by an increased production of the stress hormone cortisol by the adrenal glands. There are various reasons for an increase in cortisol production. The clinical signs of Cushing's disease are similar, regardless of the underlying cause of disease. However, it is important to try to identify the type of Cushing's disease as the treatment and prognosis (outcome) differ slightly depending upon the form of the disease.

  • Cytology is the microscopic examination of cells that have been collected from the body. Cytology is most often used to diagnose the nature of lumps and bumps found on the surface of the body. However, cytology can also be used to evaluate internal organs, body fluids, effusions, and surfaces of the body. Different techniques are employed to collect cells depending on the type of sample needed. The next diagnostic step after cytology is histology.

  • Cytology is the microscopic examination of cells that have been collected from the body. There are different methods for collecting cells from body surfaces including skin scrapings, impression smears, swabs, and flushes. Once the cells are collected, they are examined under a microscope. Sometimes examination of surface cells does not provide a definitive diagnosis and additional samples must be collected.

  • Two tests use dexamethasone (a synthetic cortisol) for diagnosing Cushing's disease or Cushing's syndrome. They are the "LOW DOSE" and the "HIGH DOSE" dexamethasone suppression test.

  • Testing for diabetes includes confirming hyperglycemia and glucosuria while looking for other conditions by checking a CBC (anemia, infection), biochemistry profile (hepatic disease, pancreatitis) and a urinalysis (urinary tract infection). Monitoring includes regular glucose curves and additional exams and testing based on the pet owner’s monitoring of their cat’s clinical signs in the home setting. Urine glucose testing and fructosamine are sometimes used in diabetic monitoring and urine testing for infection may be recommended.

  • Testing for diabetes includes confirming hyperglycemia and glucosuria while looking for other conditions by checking a CBC (anemia, infection), biochemistry profile (hepatic disease, pancreatitis) and a urinalysis (urinary tract infection). Monitoring includes regular glucose curves and additional exams and testing based on the pet owner’s monitoring of their dog’s clinical signs in the home setting. Urine glucose testing and fructosamine are sometimes used in diabetic monitoring and urine testing for infection may be recommended.

  • Sometimes called the blue print of life, DNA is a complex protein that carries the genetic code of an organism. All common forms of life, such as viruses, bacteria, plants, and animals carry a complete copy of their own DNA in each of their cells.

  • Albumin is an important protein that is normally found in the blood, but is not normally present in the urine of healthy pets.

  • Albumin is an important protein that is normally found in blood, but is not normally present in the urine of healthy pets.

  • An electrocardiogram, or ECG, is a test that is used to assess the heart. More specifically, an ECG measures the transmission of an electrical impulse through the heart. This test is not painful and is typically performed as an outpatient procedure. Analyzing the electrical impulses produced as the heart beats can help identify a number of different abnormalities within the heart.